Lesson 7:

Options Price Premium

An option premium is the current market price of an option contract. It is thus the income received by the seller (writer) of an option contract to another party. In-the-money option premiums are composed of two factors: intrinsic and extrinsic value. Out-of-the-money options' premiums consist solely of extrinsic value.

An option premium is the price paid by the buyer to the seller for an option contract. Premiums are quoted on a per-share basis because most option contracts represent 100 shares of the underlying stock. Thus, a premium that is quoted as $0.10 means that the option contract will cost $10.

It is equal to the difference between the strike or exercise price and the asset's current market value when the difference is positive. For example, suppose an investor buys a call option for XYZ Company with a strike price of $45.

KEY TAKEAWAYS The premium on an option is it's price in the market. Option premium will consist of extrinsic, or time value for out-of-the-money contracts and both intrinsic and extrinsic value for in-the-money options. An option's premium will generally be greater given more time to expiration and/or greater implied volatility. Option Alpha gives an amazing example of what an premium is.

Let's tie all this knowledge in with a video!

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